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it themselves or know someone else who may have it to help fuel this investigation. so, our tom foreman did a story of what truth may be hidden in these photos. >> reporter: while public attention focused largely on images of the twin explosions and their aftermath, investigators are more interested in this, the pictures of what happened before the blast. >> i think we're processing all the digital photographic evidence we possibly can right now as quickly as possible with resources from fbi headquarters, quantico and that's a priority of the investigation right now. >> reporter: law enforcement official tells cnn so far investigators have found no surveillance video of anyone planting either bomb. but it is early, investigators are still combing local businesses to collect all security camera videos for blocks around, and asking people along the route to hand over any and all digital images. >> it is our intention to go through every frame of every video that we have to determine exactly who was in the area. this is probably one of most well photographed areas in the country yesterday. >>
®. >>> the north koreans have a long history of speaking loudly then backing down. cnn's tom foreman has been taking a look at that history. >> wolf, as your guests have been saying throughout this entire program, this pattern goes back a long time. 1993, first time testing their long-range missile. it excited the world community with concern because they didn't think that this was where they stood. by 1995, they were testing more missiles. this missiles included cruise missiles capable of going out 100 miles at sea. they were backing away from the world's nuclear agencies that keep track of nuclear programs that also excited concern. by 2003, by this point, more developments. we found out that, in fact, they had a nuclear program which they denied for a period of time and on and on it progressed, wolf. as your guests have pointed out throughout that process, there was a constant push/pull. fear and alarm around the world. often what followed were deals. wolf? >> in the past few years, it seemed to have entered a whole new phase, hasn't it? >> as these negotiations and results keep moving up
and a half after otis started his small company, business is still looking up. tom foreman, cnn. >> hey, that's it for us. the situation in the north korea crisis starts now. >> we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. this is a "situation room" special to report north korean crisis. we're following breaking news. a chilling new claim about the ability to launch a nuclear attack even as his regime threatens war. >> we begin now with some breaking news. war could break out at any moment. there may, repeat, may be new reason to fear that it's threats of a nuclear attack are much more serious than we thought. it's a stunning new development. even as kim jung un could order one missile to launch literally at any time. let's bring in our pentagon correspondent. >> officials just told me they were completely caught off guard that this revelation was put out there in an open hearing. the holy grail has always been able to take a nuclear bomb, which we know they have, and making it small enough to fit on the end of a missile. this assess. suggests th
a long history of speaking loudly, then backing down. cnn's tom foreman has been taking a look at that history. tom, what are you seeing? >> as your guests have been saying throughout the entire program, this goes back a long time, this pattern. in 1993 is when they tested their first midrange missile that could go as far as japan and it really excited the world community with concern. over the next few years, things kept improving, and then by 1995, they were testing more missiles. these missiles included cruise missiles capable of going 100 miles out to strike ships at sea. they flew a missile all the way over japan and were backing away from the world's nuclear agencies that keep track of nuclear programs. that also excited concern. of course, by 2003, by this point, more developments. we found out, in fact, they did have a nuclear program, which they denied for a period of time and on and on it progressed, wolf. here's the thing, throughout that process, there was a constant push-pull. there would be fears, alarm around the world, and often what followed were deals, concess
on korea's military capabilities, tom foreman and retired general james "spider" marks. >> despite all the global implications of a conflict between north korea and south korea, the truth is it would really play out essentially on the korean peninsula. that's what we want to talk about right here. everyone knows the dmz has basically been fortified for a very long time. neither the south nor the north could simply charge across that and attack the other side. so if the north wanted to get something started, what would they do? >> the first thing we would see would be volumes and volumes of artillery fire and surface-to-surface missiles. these guys were trained by the soviets and the communist chinese. they know how to use long-range precision fires to try to make a difference. >> they would be firing from hidden positions? >> they are firing from positions that are on the north slope of the mountain that define the dmz. they are firing at targets that are tucked up into the dmz on the south like seoul. what that means is it's very difficult to target those locations and to observe that
if not the point of final sale. our tom foreman is out front. tom, as you have been looking through this, how are investigators trying to look through the origin of the bomb parts which show parts of serial numbers but not in full. it's tantalizing, but not all the information. >> well, one of the keys to the way they're going to track this town, erin, and you mentioned just a minute ago, pictures, we said yesterday that pictures are going to be key to all of this and today they have been very excited about this particular picture which was taken not far from where you're standing today erin. there's a package in front of a railing that has people behind it. coupled with another video coming from a camera on top of a lord & taylor's across the street. let me jump from around behind that camera and show you the point of view if you were up there looking down. see where that mailbox is? that's where the bombing took place. let's get our model and talk about the payment of everything. you are right over in this area, this has been cnn's position right over here. lord & taylor's is right over her
right. thank you so much. tom foreman is in the virtual studio. tom, this missile that north korea moved to the east coast, what kind of missile are we talking about? and what is the range? >> jake this is the type of missile that we're talking about. it is called the musadon. it can trace the development back to a russian submarine missile. there is also an iranian version. there is no fins or guidance system on it. yet, it's infective. this is one of the reasons why. you see it in parades in north korea time and again. you see it this way, on the back of a truck. it is a highly mobile missile system. once it is fueled up, it can be moved around fairly quickly and set up and fired within a matter of minutes from any location. that's one of the things that makes it dangerous. plus, it can pack quite a wa wallop. carrying a 2 1/2 ton payload which can be a warhead of just that size if you have two stages on it which makes it a little bit more unreliable. it can travel out 2500 miles. can it reach california? no. can it reach alaska? maybe a tiny part. kit reach hawaii? it certainly can re
really real? and the hijacking app, is it real or did it fizzle out? our tom foreman takes a look. >> it's a terrifying idea from like a movie. but it could be pure fiction. >> the new app exploits a security weakness mitigating a ground system and sending false information to planes in flight by manipulating the data stream a user can change displays or take over the auto pilot. at least that is what the inventor suggests. >> you can also at a certain level gain some control on where the plane is going. >> he is a security consultant says he is trying to warn the aviation community about the potential danger, but many do not believe he can do what he says, because of two key problems. problem one, the invention has only been demonstrated on a flight simulation program. the officials say cracking into the controls of a real airplane is much more difficult. therefore a hacker cannot obtain full control of an aircraft. even he admits that. >> therefore, it cannot be used against a real airplane. we did that on purpose for security reasons. >> and he at pheudz to problem two. the pilot can
could be key. tom foreman is in the virtual studio with a look at the police work that could crack the case wide open. hopefully at least. tom? >> certainly, jake. what they're really looking for, what is missing is a link between that and activity in this crowd. today tremendous emphasis on images like this one from a local tv station showing that pack sitting in front of a railing with people behind it. we've had a lot of talk about that. much of the focus today on another set of images or video captured by a security camera on a lord & taylor store across the street. this is the nearest camera to the scene of that second explosion where that package was. let me bring in my model here and show you what i'm talking about. this the model. i'll rotate it so you can see. lord & taylor is right here, this yellow building. you can see the two explosions. look at the detail. that camera we've been talking about all day is that it right there. that little blue marker shows where it is. there is the explosion right across the street. so they would have a very clear line of sight if that i
forces on the korean peninsula. cnn's tom foreman and cnn contributor retired u.s. army general spider marks take a closer look. >> wolf, the cornerstone of everything we've been talking about for the past couple of weeks is the north korean army. general, walk us through the force of this army. >> this is an army that has over about 1 million folks under arms, very large reserve component. mandatory service, from a couple of years up to ten years. >> a large force, particularly large if we think about the size of the area involved. look at this map of the united states. that's where north korea would fit, roughly in the same space as mississippi. so, as militaries go, this is a very massive force for a small country. >> but a very paranoid leadership. >> let's talk about the breakdown of that. the if you talk about the leadership, what is the number one quality required of the top officers in this military? >> loyalty to the communist party and the leader right here, kim jong-un. >> the number one quality. what about the special forces? >> very large special forces, very well trained.
identified, the security and surveillance comes at what price to americans' privacy? tom foreman is "out front." >> before the brothers reach boylston street, before the bombs and the hunt that followed, could police have been watching them and, frankly, all of us more carefully? that is the centerative fiery debate in washington and the answer is complicated. >> the technology exists. it's just that our constitution protects you from having that put in place against you. >> reporter: the potential technological power available to police is immense. first, more cameras. the number of surveillance cameras has exploded since 9/11. in chicago alone, american civil liberties union estimates there are around 10,000 private and public surveillance cameras. along with facial recognition software and that could allow police to track many thousands of people every minute. second, mormon toring of communications and travel. if police tapped into our cell phones, computers and gps units, they could collect a wealth of information about almost everything any one of us is doing. and, third, more secu
or is it big government gone bad? tom foreman is out front. >> a curious trip to russia, loud confrontations at a mosque, visits to radical websites and behavior that made even relatives disapprove. >> what i think was behind it, being losers. >> just some of that was enough to have tamerlan tsarnaev on at least one government watch list well before the boston bombings. rick nelson is an expert on these government databases. so why didn't the watch list prevent in this? >> it would be difficult for the watch list itself to stop the attack. it's just data. >> there are many watch lists in government agencies and the names of both the older tsarnaev brother and his mother were on one called tie. a low level list of about 700,000 names. there is no active surveillance of people on tide. their names are kept in case they show up in connection with a more serious threat, then they may be bumped up, where their movements would be scrutinized more closely just in case an attack is in the works, but -- >> with these particular suspects, there's nothing they did that you know, suggested that they wer
moves right now. we're doing the same thing in our virtual studio. cnn's tom foreman is there with retired u.s. army general james "spider" marks. >> all eyes are on the east coast of north korea. why, general, would they do this missile placement there? >> the east coast is closer to the united states presence in the region, and its allies. they didn't put it on the west coast because they're not trying to threaten china. >> let's bring in the model of the type of missile we're talking about. this is really designed to be used by soviet submarines. the iranians have a version of this. let's talk about it, because one of the real keys is the mobility. why does that matter so very much? >> this is a mobile missile system. it can launch from any location. all it needs is a piece of level terrain. >> let's talk about the capability of this, as well. fairly big and a lot of different ways which it can be presented. >> this is about 40 to 60 feet length, a payload of 2 1/2 tons. but what's important is the warhead. we do not anticipate that it has a nuclear warhead at all.
by. tom foreman, give us a little sense of what's going on here as far as this investigation is concerned. >> wolf, tom and i have been talking all day long about three critical time periods that have to be considered in all this. let me bring in the crime scene so we can talk about what we mean. first critical time period, the actual time of the explosion. we know that about 17,000 runners had already crossed the finish line on boylston street, another 6,000 headed that way when the first big bomb went off just short of the finish line. and about two football fields away, 12 seconds later the second bomb went off. obviously those sites, tom, are critical to investigators in terms of physical evidence. what are they looking at right now. >> tom, the first thing they want to do is recover as much of the bomb device as they can, to help identify who may have made it, how it was constructed, and get an idea whether right there it would help focus whether it's international or domestic, or a group that's been seen before by the way it was put together. so first issue is get piece
the movements inside that boat. joining us now is tom foreman, national security analyst, tom fuentes as well, assistant former director of the fbi. these thermal images, walk us through, tom, what was going on. >> we were just talking about this a moment ago, wolf, astonishing this is the boat here, so you have a sense what we are talking about, nearby house, fence on this side. tom, you were saying in this picture, you can't see much in terms of anybody inside the boat, this picture is still very valuable. why? >> it is going to help you position your tactical people, your observers, sniper observers, bomb techs and any other things. this is being shot in video. we are only seeing the still picture. so, this is getting collected through the -- excuse me, a forward-looking infrared image willing system of the helicopter that system is then being beamed down to a tactical command post right outside this area, would be very close and the tactical on-scene commander around all the key component leaders, the evidence text, the bomb text, negotiators, observers, they would all be directed in thei
the technology to mount an attack? tom foreman puts into perspecti perspective. >> reporter: in the massive parades, the display may seem impressive. more than a million troops under arms, row after row of missile l, tanks and other weaponry. but at globalsecurity.org, a killed military analyst sees something else. >> it would look pretty good to people who didn't know anything about military equipment. all these rockets are the same. but if you look at it closely, you basically see this is a lot of old, clanky stuff. >> reporter: when we asked him to look over photos, they quickly pointed out problems. old soviet-style tanks still using technology from the 1980s or even further back. anti-aircraft guns that lack any connected radar or computer targeting. boats not suitable for the high seas. almost antique equipment for communications. much of it appears to have been updated, but look at a north korean. war room compared to one in the south. >> we're talking about very simple systems. >> reporter: there is that greatest asset of the north, the massive number of troops both k active and re
that police sent into peek under the boat's tarp. i want to bring in tom foreman to break the pictures down for us. explain to us what we're looking at. >> this is the first image that we have. this is a thermal imaging picture of the boat right here that was taken at about 19 minutes past 7:00. so 19 after the homeowner spotted blood here and said he saw someone inside here. you can't tell much from this. they're looking for heat signatures. might be something up in here, but you really can't tell. but this picture, look at this very clear sign here of a strong heat signature coming from in this area. as you think about the size of a boat, that's pretty big. they knew at this time he was moving around in the boat. so as you complain chur you cap there is trailing heat. so there is a sense he's moving inside the boat even though by now they're around the point where they have either had a gun battle him or about to have the gun battle with him. we move on and then we have these images which are also amazing of then extending a robotic arm in here, tearing away some of the fabric covering th
. tom foreman joins us from washington, d.c., with more on this operation. tom, explain to us exactly, where did this all go down? >> this all happened mainly around toronto and montreal. you can see canada in here. what i've highlighted here are really the train routes run by the ia train system up there, an intercity -- typically the police up there release much less information than we're used to here. it doesn't mean they don't have the background of all of this. they just don't talk very much. the real target here apparently was train activity in and around the largest city here toronto, and if you zoom in, you can see it's a rail yard here, one of the main ones here, for via up there. these suspects apparently scouted out these locations, watched the comings and goings of trains, looked at the security system here, and had a real target of trying to hit this system. why would that matter so much? well, because via carries more than 4 million people on trips every year up there in canada, and for a long time, jake, there's been talk about the idea that train stations are comparat
of the bombs and leaving it shortly before it went off. tom foreman is "outfront" with more on the pictures and the video that was just released. tom, i have been saying it's riveting. i want to keep catching it. every time i do, i feel like i notice something else or i have another question. i no he that you going through it again and again have got to feel the same way. >> yeah. you know something, erin, that's exactly what the fbi wants you to do. they want everybody to watch it again and again and see what can you figure out. roll it out and show ut sequence. this is where they come around the corner. there is suspect number one. suspect number two. the shots overlap a little bit. they cover in all about 50 feet of walking as they go down this way. there is the second shot in the sequence. you see the one with the green bag down here. that's how you know it's the same direction. they continue this way and then there is a shot from behind as they go away. now i want to give you a little context here so you can understand where this all is. the running street is right over here. this is t
conference in roughly three minutes, and we will bring that of course to you live. tom foreman is here to tell us more about the incident and the event itself. tom? >> sure, jake. as you know, this is not just any big sporting event. for the world's runners, this is the big sporting event of the year. it's extraordinary. the route starts out here in hopkinton. it gets more and more dense as it works its way into boston. as we move toward the finish line, i'll stop it part way in here so you see landmarks, which i know john over here is well acquainted with. as you move in, you're going past fenway park over here, the massachusetts institute of technology over in here, boston college, boston university. so lot of places passing here. right now what police have been telling runners to do, this is mass ave cutting right through here. they're telling the runners on this side of mass ave to keep going toward boston common. the rest of them they want to come back toward kenmore square. let's move into the finish line and talk about what was happening there. we were talking about the crowds t
the government in check. but does that argument add up? tom foreman's "outfront" with the story. >> reporter: americans spend billions of dollars and houring filing taxes, filling in the boxes, all the numbers. >> i don't want to make any mistakes. i feel like it's too tedious, a lot of numbers. >> reporter: and if you say this should be easier to any economist, like, say, joe bankman at stanford, he'll tell you -- >> that's absolutely right, tom. >> reporter: so why isn't it? because the business of tax preparation is huge. and virtually every attempt to simplify taxes in recent years has been beaten back in part by the tax preparation industry. by companies like the one that gave us turbo tax. used by 25 million americans. >> and if we could make the process easy for taxpayers, to simply file online themselves, it stands to reason that they'd save some money and, of course, if you're in business providing services that would be bad for you. >> reporter: turbo tax is made by intuit and long lobbying congress to, quote, oppose irs government tax preparation. right now, if you go to the irs w
. cnn's tom foreman and cnn contributor retired u.s. army general spider marks take a closer look. >> wolf, the cornerstone of everything we've been talking about for the past couple of weeks is the north korean army. general, walk us through the force of this army. >> this is an army that has over about 1 million folks under arms, very large reserve component. mandatory service, from a couple of years up to ten years. >> a large force, particularly large if we think about the size of the area involved. look at this map of the united states. that's where north korea would fit, roughly in the same space as mississippi. so as militaries go, this is a very massive force for a small country. >> but a very paranoid leadership. >> let's talk about the breakdown of that. the if you talk about the leadership, what is the number one quality required of the top officers in this military? >> loyalty to the communist party and the leader right here, kim jong-un. >> the number one quality. what about the special forces? >> very large special forces, very well trained. the best of their militar
otis started his small company business is still looking up. tom foreman, cnn. >> all right, tom. >>> former president george w. bush is a grandfather. his daughter jenna bush hager gave birth to a baby girl last night in new york. margaret laura mila hager. former president and first lady say they're elated about it but mr. bush said he doesn't plan to change any diapers any time soon. don't blame him. >>> need inspiration? our nation's warriors with the special treatment they deserve. about to compete in one of this country's most famous sporting events. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll be with him all day as he goes back to taking tylenol. i was okay, but after lunch my knee started to hurt again. and now i've got to take more pills. ♪ yup. another pill stop. can i get my aleve back yet? ♪ for my pain, i want my aleve. ♪ [ male announcer ] look for the easy-open red arthritis cap. how old is the oldest person you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great thi
to improve their identification value. >> let's go to tom foreman right now. he's taking a closer look at these images, the video and still photos that the fbi has released. >> wolf, i've been listening to your conversation over here. this is the actual sequence of this video, with these fellows turning the corner here, and then it picks up in the middle sequence of these shots. you see them start working further along the way here. as you see that, you realize they're in the middle of that walk. you see the woman with the bright green bag down there, that's the middle of it. as they come up this way, it joins into the last part of the sequence where you see them walking away from us. i've counted up here based on the sidewalk blocks, we're seeing about 50 feet or so of ground being covered. because there's some overlap in the various shots and where they're going. a couple of things we noticed, probably worth noting in all of this. for example, if you look down at the time stamp, all of this is taking place approximately 12 1/2 minutes before the first bomb blast went off. we don't kn
? for "out front," tom foreman, washington. >> it's a big question. it's one after 9/11 this country had to address. now we have to address it again. "out front," matt welch, and ari fleischer. you've been in the middle of this controversy before, obviously. as we all know. 48% of people, according to "the washington post" after the boston bombings worry the government is going to too far. and 41% are afraid our government will not go far enough. if they had more ability to watch over people, they could have stopped these guys from killing and injuring these people to begin with. >> erin, there's a forever strain between liberty and security in our country. and that particularly gets tested at a time when something like boston or after september 11th. i'm reminded of one of the most beautiful sayings i ever heard at cambridge university in massachusetts. laws are the restraints that make us free, which is an amazing paradox, if you think a restraint can make us free. that's what civil society is. when times are tense and there's a security risk to our country i err on the side of law enf
. >> tom foreman, thank you. only a handful of americans have ever set foot inside north korea. former governor bill richardson is one of them. he's been there several times and now joins me. thanks for joining us. as we just mentioned the north koreans have moved missile components to their east coast likely for a test launch that could pass over japan. how are president obama and the administration trying to cool down this situation right now? >> well, they're doing i believe a good job. first dialing down some of the military maneuvers, the rhetoric and response to the north korean very angry rhetoric. but the reality is, jake, that the north koreans have really not done anything. they had those missile launchers before the underground tests but despite the ratcheting up and the threats and the activity, they really haven't done much. if they shoot this missile it's very serious. another sign is the industrial park in kasong. this is on the border with south korea. i noticed the north koreans are not letting the 4,000 south koreans that work there come in but the 54,000 north korean
to get your head around but tom foreman is in the virtual studio with a look at how widespread it is. >> hey, jake. the simple truth is we've been analyzing the shock wave that went out from this explosion and it really is absolutely astonishing here in central texas. let me bring in the map and tell you what i'm talking about. we'll zoom into central texas. watch as we start this right in the middle in real time. you see that growing right there? 12 seconds. that's how long we think it took for this shock wave to travel from that plant 25 miles away to waco. how did it do it so fast? this was a supersonic blast wave traveling between 4,000 and 6700 miles an hour. in waco what do they get out of this? basically all they got was sort of a rattling of the windows, a sense something big had happened. some people said it must have been like oklahoma city. in some ways they are very right. not any real damage there. just a shock they could feel that far away. you move in closer on this map and you take it down to a mile away or less where you talk about the downtown of this area then you
for the suspect. don lemon thank you. tom foreman joins us to map this out in boston. explain how the authorities have been able to systematically shut down the town in hopes of finding this one guy dzhokhar tsarnaev. >> this is really unprecedented. i haven't seen anything like this. if you think about the hunt what they've done is shut down an entire metropolitan area more than 4 million people in an effort to contain these folks. it all began with that shootout last night with the m.i.t. police officer where he was tragically killed. when that was done, this is what authorities knew. they knew that these people were still in the area. a short time later in the next gun fight they also knew this one had been killed. so what did they have left now? now they knew who their other suspect was and they knew that he stayed around here. that he lived around here. so they took action and this really is unprecedented. the first thing they did was asked about 600 or 300,000 people in six different communities to lock their doors, to seal up, not open their doors. they shut down this part of town. shortly
with words here out of an abundance of caution trying to avoid a rush to judgment. >> tom foreman tells us what police will be looking for to answer those questions. >> one of the mysteries of these attacks is that they happen so late in the sporting event. only about 6,000 remained. had long passed and left. and that's when these explosions happen. they're trying to find anyway to see a connection between the people who were along this course before the explosions and the time they happened. if they can find that, that's a lead. that's something they can follow and then maybe they can solve some of the mysteries of these attacks. >> and now thanks to tom for that report. witnesses say there was a very heavy security presence during the marathon. >> and those behind the attacks found a crack big enough to cause very serious damage. >> i think atlanta and the olympics was probably the most prominent in terms of the most successful terrorist or malicious attack. but securing something like a marathon is incredibly difficult. to try to protect it all the way along the route is impossible. >>
tom foreman has been watching the video over and over again like you have and we have. he's going over it pixel by pixel. tom, what have you learned? >> that's exactly what the fbi wants you to do. they want you to watch it again and again. let's scroll through the actual sequence of it. there's suspect number one and two. they cover in all about 50 feet of walking as they go down this way. there's the second shot in the sequence m you can see him coming this way. you can see the green bag down here. they continue this way and then there's a shot from behind as they go away. now, i want to give you a little bit of context here so people can understand where this all is. the running street is right over here. this is the direction they are coming. so i'm going to let this cycle back. you can see them coming back us again. this is suspect number one, suspect number two. this is the street. the race is up here going this direction. these gentlemen are coming around and they are headed in a dleax is generally from the west to the east. they are also in the right sequence. if this is number
foreman has been taking a look at that history. tom, what are you seeing? >> as your guests have been saying throughout the entire program, this goes back a long time, this pattern. in 1993 is when they tested their first midrange missile that could go as far as japan and it really excited the world community with concern. over the next few years, things kept improving, and then by 1995, they were testing more missiles. these missiles included cruise missiles capable of going 100 miles out to strike ships at sea. they flew a missile all the way over japan and were backing away from the world's nuclear agencies that keep track of nuclear programs. that also excited concern. of course, by 2003, by this point, more developments. we found out, in fact, they did have a nuclear program, which they denied for a period of time and on and on it progressed, wolf. here's the thing, throughout that process, there was a constant push-pull. there would be fears, alarm around the world, and often what followed were deals, concessions, that gave them food or gave them fuel or gave them new technology
will stay that way. tom foreman, cnn, washington. >> thank you for joining us. i'll see you tomorrow beginning at 12:00 noon eastern time. >>> hello everyone, i'm ashleigh banfield, and a busy day happening now. more serious fallout from the scandal at rutgers universal. espn is reporting that athletic director tim pernetti is out of a job. this comes after the resignation of the assistant coach, jimmy martelli. for martelli this all is a result of what you have on your screen, a video broadcast by espn showing coaches, at least one in particular, physically and verbally abusing the players. our pamela brown joins us now on the telephone. pamela, what more do you know about this decision? is this whiplash? is this strategic? or is there nothing to read into it because it's just too early? >> reporter: right now, it is too early. we have been reaching out to the university today. so far, officials they are staying tight-lipped. there is a press conference at 1:00 today at rutgers university, so we hope to learn more then. but right now, according to espn and other reports, a decision
's a terrifying idea, something like from a movie. does it add up? tom foreman has a special report. >> reporter: a new app exploits a security weakness, mimicking a ground based navigation system and sending false information to planes in flight. a user can change instrument displays, make oxygen masks drop or take over the autopilot. at least that is what the inventor hugo tesso suggests. >> reporter: he is a pilot and security consultant says he tried to warn the aviation community about a potential danger. but many do not believe he can do what he says because of two key problems -- problem one -- his invention has so far been demonstrated only on a flight simulation program. federal aviation administration and european officials say cracking into the controls of a real airplane is much more difficult. therefore, a hacker cannot obtain full control of an aircraft. even tesso admits that. >> reporter: he also admits to problem two, at any time on any plane subjected to such an attack, the pilot can override the hacker. simply turning off the autopilot and taking control again. that's why avia
. wolf? >> tom foreman, thanks for that explanation. our own pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence, went over the videos of this season with a former atf assistant director michael bouchard. >> can they take that video from the second scene and start to build the case backwards to photos like these? >> yes. what the investigators will do will look at the cameras an hour and a half, two hours before the bomb blasts to see who was in the area at the time. checking it every 15, 20 minutes. if they see the same person in the same pictures, it's not likely they were there to watch someone else finish the race. >> can we tell pretty much where that first bomb was plant? >> yes, in this picture between the light pole and the building, you can see how heavily concentrated the people are. so if someone left a backpack or duffel bag on the ground, people wouldn't really notice it. >> is there any way the bomb could have been placed on the curb? >> it's highly unlikely the bomb was placed on the curb. because when the bomb went off, this were runners who were going by at the same time. and they wer
's go to tom foreman for a closer look at those images. >> piers, this is the video the fbi wants everyone to look at. here he comes, suspect number one, according to the fbi, and suspect number two, heading down the sidewalk. it's good to have some frame of reference here to understand exactly where they're going and why this matters so much to the fbi. where are these people? right now the police they're headed down is boylston avenue. this is actually the race happening right on you here, headed this direction. they're moving with the race. right now this person, who is now associated with the first blast near the finish line, is about three blocks away from that location. the second person back here now associated with the second blast is about 1 1/2 blocks away from that location. so, they're in the right position. the police say that they're moving together. why would they think that? two people walking down the sidewalk. you'll notice they're moving at exactly the same speed. the one behind is following in exactly the same position in relation to the front. at the end of th
a pro. >>> usa, usa! >> we want to show you exactly how it all unfolded. here's cnn's tom foreman. >> reporter: they established a capture net for this suspect and enlisted the help of 4.5 million people. they figured out where they thought he would be in one of these six towns here, about 300,000 people living there. they said to everyone, lock your doors, clear the streets. they focused on watertown in particular. again, keep your doors locked. they flooded the zone with police officers and started cutting off all access in and out of this area. how did they do that? they asked 5,500 taxi drivers around boston, stay away. they shut down subways and buses, asking businesses to close. fenway park canceled the ball game. other places said, workers, don't come in, we're not going to operate today. they shut down schools, harvard, m.i.t., all shut down. beyond that they put pressure on the trains. look, you can see what's happening around watertown here. they effectively put up a capture net and started squeezing and the belief this was caught in the middle of it all. let's put this
in the sole surviving suspect. our tom foreman explauns. >> the stunning images are a testament to the tenacity and the technology that was brought to bear in this chase. let's remember that the authorities have been closing in all day on this neighborhood setting up a net so this man could not escape. somebody looked in his backyard in his boat and saw a body. thousands of officers put up a kor don and then they called in the technology. a thermal imaging helicopter. that's a device that will fly around and look down at the ground with a special camera that reads any kind of heat signatur signatures. what did uz that mean? even the heat of a body will show up. this is what they saw in the boat. there was indeed someone in the boat as the witness had suggested and he was moving around. a gunfight broke out. he was hit at least two more times. they threw flash-bang grenades in there. then everything got quiet. that was a moment at which they brought in more technology. essentially a robotic arm which reached in and started tearing away at the fabric and trying to get a better loo
said that! >> wow, the alien doth protest too much. then tom foreman, he thought the best use of the news apparatus is to drop backpack. >> if you look at the outline of the backpack this is a fairly substantial pack here. that's a fairly substantial backpack. >> yeah tom, we on earth call those backpacks, and that's what they are shaped like. now do you want to say something useful? and finally we would like to tip our hat to the fbi agent who cracked the whole case. richard deloriay because -- there has got to be at least two brains in that head. i'm done talking now. >> michael: thank you for joining us here in "the war room." before we go, we have to say a sad good-bye to folk singer richie habens. he is best known for his spiring performance of motherless child captured in the wood stock film. it immortalized future generates of activists. good night and good-bye richie havens. ♪ freedom freedom, freedom ♪ ♪ sometimes i feel like a motherless child ♪ young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actual
to the boston marathon bombing. tom foreman has more. >> the target for this alleged terror plot was the train system in canada. it is an intercity connecting system. in fact, that is where the two men were arrested. this is what authorities say they were up to watching trains coming into and out of toronto, surveying the trains themselves looking for a weak spot that they could attack and try to derail a train. this is a very, very busy hub there. you can see just exactly how urbanized this area might be. this was the sign right there telling you where you are. the belief was if they had been able to get into this train station and derail the train it would have amounted in heavy loss of life and real damage and yet authorities say they machnad to stop the plot in time. >> while we are talking about travel the u.s. transportation security administration is holding off on the planes to allow passengers to carry small knives. officials say they will delay the rule so they can further review comments from the public. among the most vocal opponents unions representing flight attendants. >>> an un
to comment on their nationality. they also said there's no connection to the boston bombings. tom foreman has more on the canadian terror plot from cnn washington. >> reporter: the target for this alleged terror plot was the via train system in canada. it's an inner city connecting system. it's used by 4 million canadians. it's from toronto and montreal. in fact, that's where these two men were arrested. this is what authorities say they were up to, that they were watching trains coming into and out of toronto surveying the tracks, surveying the trains themselves, looking for a weak spot that they could attack and try to derail a train. this is one of the very, very busy hubs there. if i take you down to street level you can see just exactly how urbanized this area might be. this is the via train sign telling you where you are. the belief was that if they had been able to get into this train station and in fact derail a train, it would have amounted in heavy loss of life and real damage and yet authorities say they managed to stop the plot in time. now they'll have to prove that case in court
in case this is more than just saber rattling. tom foreman is standing by here in our virtual studio, our pentagon correspondent barbara starr is over at the pentagon. first to you, barbara, with the very latest. what's going on? >> wolf, earlier today the pentagon announced it was sending a missile defense system to the u.s. territory of guam, 2,000 miles east of the korean peninsula, because the north korean regime has threatened to attack the base in guam. the question on the table, is this all rhetoric or is it serious, is there a threat. u.s. officials shaking their heads at these latest words out of pyongyang. the assessment is that, look, north korea could not readily attack the continental united states, alaska or hawaii with its missiles, or its nuclear capability. it could attack, of course, the 28,000 troops just across the border in south korea. it's put the entire region on edge, and defense secretary chuck hagel made clear today, how soberly he is taking all of this. >> i hope the north will ratchet this very dangerous rhetoric down. there is a pathway that's responsible for
where they are. >> good point. tom foreman is over here with tom fuentes the former fbi assistant director and cnn analyst now. take us through this video, the still photos frame by frame so our viewers get a better sense of the evidence the fbi has released. >> there are really three pieces of video here. the first is the head on view or front view of them walking by. then we get a secondary view from behind as you see them walking away there. then we get a third view of them coming around a corner, which offers another perspective on all of them. tom, one of the things i was struck by is they said in the press room here they seem to be associated with each other. what would make you believe that? yes they are waubing in the same direction on the same sidewalk. why would you believe there is an association? >> you might not from these videos. again, they have more videos they've looked at. maybe the way they were in other parts of the sidewalk or at other times of the day. they're going to have more than just this little clip. this is the only thing they'll release to the public.
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